Michael Henson

Michael Henson, PhD

Professor;
Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School,
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Morehead State University

Michael Henson holds BS and MS degrees from the University of Tennessee, and the PhD from the University of Arkansas. He completed postdoctoral training through a National Research Service Award, as National Institutes of Health Fellow in Perinatal Endocrinology in the School of Medicine of the University of Maryland, where he was later Research Assistant Professor.

He then became Assistant Professor and was later tenured as Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Tulane University School of Medicine, where he was also Director of Obstetrics and Gynecology Research, Chief of the Section of Perinatal Research, and Affiliate Scientist at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Concurrently, he held academic appointments at Tulane in the Departments of Physiology and Anatomy, and in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology. His primary research described estrogen’s role in maintaining placental progesterone synthesis to preserve threatened pregnancies. Other work centered on leptin, a hormone that regulates energy balance and conceptus development, and identified cadmium, an industrial pollutant and tobacco constituent, as an inhibitor of progesterone synthesis that linked maternal exposure to premature labor and miscarriage. In 2004 he was Tulane University’s Dissertation Director of the Year and was elected a Fellow of both Newcomb College and the Tulane Center for Evidence-Based Global Health for his contributions to women’s health research. He moved to Purdue University Calumet (now Purdue University Northwest) in 2006 as Professor and Head of the Department of Biological Sciences and was later Interim Dean of the School of Engineering, Mathematics and Science.

He then became Assistant Professor and was later tenured as Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Tulane University School of Medicine, where he was also Director of Obstetrics and Gynecology Research, Chief of the Section of Perinatal Research, and Affiliate Scientist at the Tulane National Primate Research Center. Concurrently, he held academic appointments at Tulane in the Departments of Physiology and Anatomy, and in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Molecular and Cellular Biology. His primary research described estrogen’s role in maintaining placental progesterone synthesis to preserve threatened pregnancies. Other work centered on leptin, a hormone that regulates energy balance and conceptus development, and identified cadmium, an industrial pollutant and tobacco constituent, as an inhibitor of progesterone synthesis that linked maternal exposure to premature labor and miscarriage. In 2004 he was Tulane University’s Dissertation Director of the Year and was elected a Fellow of both Newcomb College and the Tulane Center for Evidence-Based Global Health for his contributions to women’s health research. He moved to Purdue University Calumet (now Purdue University Northwest) in 2006 as Professor and Head of the Department of Biological Sciences and was later Interim Dean of the School of Engineering, Mathematics and Science.